but the strange journey with locomotive and steamship bewildered him dreadfully; and the clamor of the metropolis, into which he was flung pell-mell, altogether stupefied him.
todaysdocument:


Picking up debris of trains after Pope’s retreat. Second Battle of Bull Run., ca. 1860 - ca. 1865
From the series: Mathew Brady Photographs of Civil War-Era Personalities and Scenes

The Second Battle of Bull Run ended in defeat for Union forces under Major General John Pope by Confederate General Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia on August 30, 1862, a little over a year after the first Battle of Bull Run in the same area.

todaysdocument:

Picking up debris of trains after Pope’s retreat. Second Battle of Bull Run., ca. 1860 - ca. 1865

From the series: Mathew Brady Photographs of Civil War-Era Personalities and Scenes

The Second Battle of Bull Run ended in defeat for Union forces under Major General John Pope by Confederate General Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia on August 30, 1862, a little over a year after the first Battle of Bull Run in the same area.

reekie, john.  [cold harbor, va. african americans collecting bones of soldiers killed in the battle]. [1864]

reekie, john.  [cold harbor, va. african americans collecting bones of soldiers killed in the battle]. [1864]

"he could forgive nothing in this evening.  but it was too like other evening, this town was too like other town, for him to move out of this lying undressed on the bed, even into comfort or despair.  even the rain—there was often rain, there was often a party, and there had been other violence not of his doing—other fights, not quite so pointless, but fights in his car; fights, unheralded confessions, sudden lovemaking—none of any of this his, not his to keep, but belonging to the people of these towns he passed through, coming out of their rooted pasts, out of their remaining in one place, coming out of their time.  he himself had no time.  he was free: helpless." 

"he could forgive nothing in this evening.  but it was too like other evening, this town was too like other town, for him to move out of this lying undressed on the bed, even into comfort or despair.  even the rain—there was often rain, there was often a party, and there had been other violence not of his doing—other fights, not quite so pointless, but fights in his car; fights, unheralded confessions, sudden lovemaking—none of any of this his, not his to keep, but belonging to the people of these towns he passed through, coming out of their rooted pasts, out of their remaining in one place, coming out of their time.  he himself had no time.  he was free: helpless." 

WWI Waterfront Passes
“a woman had to choose her own particular unhappiness carefully.” 

“a woman had to choose her own particular unhappiness carefully.” 

criminalwisdom:

Execution of Mary Surratt, Lewis Powell, David Herold, and George Atzerodt on July 7, 1865, at Fort McNair in Washington, D.C.

criminalwisdom:

Execution of Mary Surratt, Lewis Powell, David Herold, and George Atzerodt on July 7, 1865, at Fort McNair in Washington, D.C.

[on the deep cut of the chesapeake and delaware canals:] the work force was recruited in philadelphia and was mostly composed of corkonians lately arrived from ireland. on paydays they dropped their tolls and hurried off to the shantytown on the bayshore that had been set up to cater to their appetite for whisky and women.
"these minor impressions had formed him.  they had washed away long ago, only to reappear, reconstituted.  they kept distracting him, like pieces of landscape viewed from a train.  the landscape was familiar, but certain things always jolted him, as if seen for the first time."
and, 
"as quietly variegated as a handful of sand, that he could discern only now, under the lamplight." 

"these minor impressions had formed him.  they had washed away long ago, only to reappear, reconstituted.  they kept distracting him, like pieces of landscape viewed from a train.  the landscape was familiar, but certain things always jolted him, as if seen for the first time."

and, 

"as quietly variegated as a handful of sand, that he could discern only now, under the lamplight." 

criminalwisdom:


Prairie Flower, the sharpshooter—a contemporary of Annie Oakley and Buffalo Bill, c. 1880s (via)

(Source: weirdvintage)

criminalwisdom:

Prairie Flower, the sharpshooter—a contemporary of Annie Oakley and Buffalo Bill, c. 1880s (via)

(Source: weirdvintage)