reekie, john.  [cold harbor, va. african americans collecting bones of soldiers killed in the battle]. [1864]

reekie, john.  [cold harbor, va. african americans collecting bones of soldiers killed in the battle]. [1864]

"he could forgive nothing in this evening.  but it was too like other evening, this town was too like other town, for him to move out of this lying undressed on the bed, even into comfort or despair.  even the rain—there was often rain, there was often a party, and there had been other violence not of his doing—other fights, not quite so pointless, but fights in his car; fights, unheralded confessions, sudden lovemaking—none of any of this his, not his to keep, but belonging to the people of these towns he passed through, coming out of their rooted pasts, out of their remaining in one place, coming out of their time.  he himself had no time.  he was free: helpless." 

"he could forgive nothing in this evening.  but it was too like other evening, this town was too like other town, for him to move out of this lying undressed on the bed, even into comfort or despair.  even the rain—there was often rain, there was often a party, and there had been other violence not of his doing—other fights, not quite so pointless, but fights in his car; fights, unheralded confessions, sudden lovemaking—none of any of this his, not his to keep, but belonging to the people of these towns he passed through, coming out of their rooted pasts, out of their remaining in one place, coming out of their time.  he himself had no time.  he was free: helpless." 

WWI Waterfront Passes
“a woman had to choose her own particular unhappiness carefully.” 

“a woman had to choose her own particular unhappiness carefully.” 

criminalwisdom:

Execution of Mary Surratt, Lewis Powell, David Herold, and George Atzerodt on July 7, 1865, at Fort McNair in Washington, D.C.

criminalwisdom:

Execution of Mary Surratt, Lewis Powell, David Herold, and George Atzerodt on July 7, 1865, at Fort McNair in Washington, D.C.

[on the deep cut of the chesapeake and delaware canals:] the work force was recruited in philadelphia and was mostly composed of corkonians lately arrived from ireland. on paydays they dropped their tolls and hurried off to the shantytown on the bayshore that had been set up to cater to their appetite for whisky and women.
"these minor impressions had formed him.  they had washed away long ago, only to reappear, reconstituted.  they kept distracting him, like pieces of landscape viewed from a train.  the landscape was familiar, but certain things always jolted him, as if seen for the first time."
and, 
"as quietly variegated as a handful of sand, that he could discern only now, under the lamplight." 

"these minor impressions had formed him.  they had washed away long ago, only to reappear, reconstituted.  they kept distracting him, like pieces of landscape viewed from a train.  the landscape was familiar, but certain things always jolted him, as if seen for the first time."

and, 

"as quietly variegated as a handful of sand, that he could discern only now, under the lamplight." 

criminalwisdom:


Prairie Flower, the sharpshooter—a contemporary of Annie Oakley and Buffalo Bill, c. 1880s (via)

(Source: weirdvintage)

criminalwisdom:

Prairie Flower, the sharpshooter—a contemporary of Annie Oakley and Buffalo Bill, c. 1880s (via)

(Source: weirdvintage)

Nautical trade routes stretch like so many lengths of string in this arresting visualization of intercontinental commerce in the 1800s. The map that emerges highlights not only several continents and their busiest ports, but the various trade winds that cycle through the lower reaches of Earth’s atmosphere.
The map is the work of Ben Schmidt, assistant professor of history at Northeastern University. Like many of our favoritevisualizations, Schmidt’s creation sprang from a publicly available data set: ship’s logs, originally compiled by 19th Century oceanographer Lt. Matthew Fontaine Maury, that were later catalogued by NOAA. Schmidt calls the map an exercise in the “Digital Humanities,” where tools from the 1990s are used “to answer questions from the 1960s about 19th century America.”

Nautical trade routes stretch like so many lengths of string in this arresting visualization of intercontinental commerce in the 1800s. The map that emerges highlights not only several continents and their busiest ports, but the various trade winds that cycle through the lower reaches of Earth’s atmosphere.

The map is the work of Ben Schmidt, assistant professor of history at Northeastern University. Like many of our favoritevisualizations, Schmidt’s creation sprang from a publicly available data set: ship’s logs, originally compiled by 19th Century oceanographer Lt. Matthew Fontaine Maury, that were later catalogued by NOAA. Schmidt calls the map an exercise in the “Digital Humanities,” where tools from the 1990s are used “to answer questions from the 1960s about 19th century America.”

tuesday-johnson:

ca. 1860-70’s, [carte de visite portrait of Olive Oatman, Survivor of the Oatman Massacre and held five years in captivity by Yavapais indians]

"In 1851 Olive Oatman survived the brutal massacre of most of her family by the Yavapais in Arizona and was held in captivity for five years. While in captivity she was tattooed on her face and arms in the tribal tradition.”

via Heritage Auctions

tuesday-johnson:

ca. 1860-70’s, [carte de visite portrait of Olive Oatman, Survivor of the Oatman Massacre and held five years in captivity by Yavapais indians]

"In 1851 Olive Oatman survived the brutal massacre of most of her family by the Yavapais in Arizona and was held in captivity for five years. While in captivity she was tattooed on her face and arms in the tribal tradition.”

via Heritage Auctions